1491

1491
Author: Charles C. Mann
Publisher: Vintage
Total Pages: 541
Release: 2006
Genre: History
ISBN: 1400032059


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Describes how recent archaeological research has transformed long-held myths about the Americas, revealing far older and more advanced cultures with a greater population than were previously thought to have existed.

1491

1491
Author: Charles C. Mann
Publisher: Granta Books
Total Pages: 576
Release: 2014-10-02
Genre: History
ISBN: 1783781424


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Up until very recently it was believed that in 1491, the year before Columbus landed, the Americas, one-third of the earth's surface, were a near-pristine wilderness inhabited by small roaming bands of indigenous people. But recently unexpected discoveries have dramatically changed our understanding of Indian life. Many scholars now argue that the Indians were much more numerous, were in the Americas for far longer and had far more ecological impact on the land than previously believed. This knowledge has enormous implications for today's environmental disputes, yet little has filtered into textbooks and even less into public awareness. Mann brings together all of the latest research, and the results of his own travels throughout North and South America, to provide a new, fascinating and iconoclastic account of the Americas before Columbus.

Before Columbus

Before Columbus
Author: Charles C. Mann
Publisher: Simon and Schuster
Total Pages: 128
Release: 2009-09-08
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction
ISBN: 1416949003


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Based on the startling revelations that the author presented in his adult-level 1491: New Revelations of the Americas Before Columbus, this book for young readers is a fascinating full-color journey into the world of the many advanced cultures that populated the Americas before the arrival of European explorers.

1491

1491
Author: Charles C. Mann
Publisher:
Total Pages: 509
Release: 2005
Genre: America
ISBN: 9780739464410


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Mann shows how a new generation of researchers equipped with novel scientific techniques have come to previously unheard-of conclusions about the Americas before the arrival of the Europeans: In 1491 there were probably more people living in the Americas than in Europe. Certain cities--such as Tenochtitlán, the Aztec capital--were greater in population than any European city. Tenochtitlán, unlike any capital in Europe at that time, had running water, beautiful botanical gardens, and immaculately clean streets. The earliest cities in the Western Hemisphere were thriving before the Egyptians built the great pyramids. Native Americans transformed their land so completely that Europeans arrived in a hemisphere already massively "landscaped" by human beings. Pre-Columbian Indians in Mexico developed corn by a breeding process that the journal Science recently described as "man's first, and perhaps the greatest, feat of genetic engineering."--Publisher description.

1493

1493
Author: Charles C. Mann
Publisher: Vintage
Total Pages: 561
Release: 2011-08-09
Genre: History
ISBN: 0307596729


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NATIONAL BESTSELLER • A deeply engaging history of how European settlements in the post-Colombian Americas shaped the world—from the highly acclaimed author of 1491. • "Fascinating...Lively...A convincing explanation of why our world is the way it is." —The New York Times Book Review Presenting the latest research by biologists, anthropologists, archaeologists, and historians, Mann shows how the post-Columbian network of ecological and economic exchange fostered the rise of Europe, devastated imperial China, convulsed Africa, and for two centuries made Mexico City—where Asia, Europe, and the new frontier of the Americas dynamically interacted—the center of the world. In this history, Mann uncovers the germ of today's fiercest political disputes, from immigration to trade policy to culture wars. In 1493, Mann has again given readers an eye-opening scientific interpretation of our past, unequaled in its authority and fascination.

In Pre-Columbian America

In Pre-Columbian America
Author: Marylou Kjelle
Publisher: Mitchell Lane Publishers, Inc.
Total Pages: 64
Release: 2010-12-23
Genre: Juvenile Nonfiction
ISBN: 1612280269


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If you were a boy growing up in pre-Columbian America, you would learn how to hunt, grow crops, or fish for your dinner. If you were a girl, you’d learn how to skin animals and use the hides to make clothing, or twist the fibers of plants to make yarn. You might also be a builder—taking bark and sewing it to saplings to make a shelter called a wigwam. Even though you wouldn’t go to school, you’d learn everything you needed to know to become a happy and healthy member of society. Older members of the clan would teach you. Find out how the many cultures across the land, from the Thules and the Iroquois to the people of the Great Plains, lived, loved, and celebrated life in the Americas before European settlement.

Education for Tomorrow

Education for Tomorrow
Author: Michael Risku
Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media
Total Pages: 214
Release: 2013-02-11
Genre: Education
ISBN: 9462091587


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Education for Tomorrow A Biocentric, Student-Focused Approach to Education Reform Michael Risku University of the Incarnate Word, USA and Letitia Harding University of the Incarnate Word, USA There are many books on the market which discuss indigenous ways of knowing, and bemoan western society’s seeming lack of interest in anything other than scientific fact-based knowledge. Equally plentiful are the writings of critical theorists who consider today’s public education system to be divisive, and manipulated by those in power to ensure that their children have the educational advantages needed to maintain the elite hierarchical status quo. Education for Tomorrow is unique in that it brings both of these approaches together first by examining the ways that indigenous people and women of all cultures acquire and pass on knowledge, and the deleterious effects that enforced Eurocentric systems have had on that process. The authors then turn to public schools to explore the influences, both good and bad, that today’s programs have on the distribution of opportunities afforded to all children in the United States. Finally, they offer suggestions for a revolutionary education system which highlights the need for all students to have the encouragement and freedom to look critically and rationally at their lives and at their relationship with the natural world. This can be achieved by looking back to the pedagogical methods of our indigenous ancestors, and forward to a time when all children, regardless of ethnic or socio-economic heritage, are taught in such a way that every aspect of their lives is addressed, nurtured, valued, and enhanced.

Material Hermeneutics

Material Hermeneutics
Author: Don Ihde
Publisher: Routledge
Total Pages: 160
Release: 2021-11-29
Genre: History
ISBN: 1000472949


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Material Hermeneutics explores the ways in which new imaging technologies and scientific instruments have changed our notions about ancient history. From the first lunar calendar to the black hole image, and from an ancient mummy in the Italian Alps to the irrigated valleys of Mesopotamia, this book demonstrates how revolutions in science have taught us far more than we imagined. Written by a leading philosopher of technology and utilizing an interdisciplinary approach, this book has implications for many fields, including philosophy, history, science, and technology. It will appeal to scholars and students of the humanities, as well as anthropologists and archaeologists.

1493

1493
Author: Charles C. Mann
Publisher: Knopf
Total Pages: 561
Release: 2011
Genre: Biography & Autobiography
ISBN: 0307265722


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More than 200 million years ago, geological forces split apart the continents. Isolated from each other, the two halves of the world developed totally different suites of plants and animals. Columbus's voyages brought them back together--and marked the beginning of an extraordinary exchange of flora and fauna between Eurasia and the Americas.

The Myths That Made America

The Myths That Made America
Author: Heike Paul
Publisher: transcript Verlag
Total Pages: 451
Release: 2014-08-31
Genre: Language Arts & Disciplines
ISBN: 3839414857


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This essential introduction to American studies examines the core foundational myths upon which the nation is based and which still determine discussions of US-American identities today. These myths include the myth of »discovery,« the Pocahontas myth, the myth of the Promised Land, the myth of the Founding Fathers, the melting pot myth, the myth of the West, and the myth of the self-made man. The chapters provide extended analyses of each of these myths, using examples from popular culture, literature, memorial culture, school books, and every-day life. Including visual material as well as study questions, this book will be of interest to any student of American studies and will foster an understanding of the United States of America as an imagined community by analyzing the foundational role of myths in the process of nation building.